Thursday, 13 April 2017

Real Easter Egg (1971)


Back in the 1970s, many people complained that the word “Easter” had been dropped from the packaging of chocolate eggs. They also claimed it was only a matter of time before other Christian Easter imagery, such as anthropomorphised cartoon chicks playing with bashful ducks or dungaree-wearing bunny rabbits, received the same treatment.

The Scarfolk Confectionery Company was only too happy to remind consumers of the true biblical events surrounding Easter: Gruesome acts of mutilation and torture, filicide/suicide, crude carpentry and auto-exhumation were all necessary to atone for the original sin that most people agree is historically unfounded, though still blame on one woman’s innocent desire for a healthy snack.

The Scarfolk Confectionery Company ensured that the word “Easter” was not omitted from its products (see above, from a 1971 brochure), in fact it was printed on the packaging over 100 times with corrosive ink that burned the word into the skin of the consumer. Anyone not bearing the burn scars was deemed by the government to be "unBritish".

Happy Easter from Scarfolk!
For more Easter-related artefacts, see also Rabies Easter Eggs, Jellied Babies and Confectionery Branded Cigarettes.

4 comments:

  1. Friend of mine ended up with the with east burned into his penis, don't ask......

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    1. prudent that I don't...another victim of vicious misinformation at the time about the viability of curing hierophilia by 'clearing the custard' from a creme egg...the poor blighter....but chin up, they increased the font size over time hopefully lessening any associated shame...9-point wasn't doing the SCS Living-Eye Surveillance Computer project any favours....

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  2. Can you do something similar for Islam or don't you have the courage?

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    1. As the masthead states, this site focuses on British culture of the 1970s (often through the personal experiences of the author). Islam was not a mainstream issue in the UK at the time and is therefore not within the remit of this site. The site, however, has not shied away from commenting on terrorism and/or religious-political violence (if that's what you're alluding to), both specifically and generally, and has, for example, mentioned the IRA on more than one occasion.

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